Rose Hip Jam

rose hip jam recipeRose hips form after the fragrant rose petals have fallen away, and the pollinated flower swells to form seedpods that slowly ripen from green to a rich red-orange. Rugosa roses make the most highly regarded hips, with a deep flavor and a high ratio of flesh to seed. When the seeds are screened out, and the leathery fruits simmered in water, the flavor builds and swells. Rich in Vitamin C, rose hips are often used in tea, but we’ve been enjoying this jam as well, spread on a dense slice of pumpernickel with morning tea.

If you are not familiar with the water bath canning method watch our water bath canning video workshop. Always make sure you are following all safety guidelines outlined by the USDA when canning anything. 

Ingredients

Rose hips, weighed, in any amount. 
I cup water per pound rose hips
Sugar in proportion to measured rose hips, after milling
Lemon juice if desired


ingredients for rose hip jam
Prepare a water bath canner and half-pint jars.
Add the dried rose hips to a heavy-bottomed pan.
add rose hips to panAdd one cup of water per pound of rose hips.
Simmer the rose hips in water until they are soft and silky, adding more water if needed to maintain a gentle simmer.
drain liquid from panOnce softened, drain the liquid from the pan, reserving it, if desired, for adding to beverages or dressings.
run through food millRun the rose hips through the fine plate of a food mill into a measuring container, to remove the seeds. (Even if using store-bought hips, which usually have most of the seeds removed, the food mill will catch some that sneaked their way into your jam, and homogenize the texture.)

Measure the quantity of milled rose hips, and return to the pan.

Add an equal amount of sugar, and a squeeze of lemon juice, if desired.
add sugar to milled rose hipsStir to combine, then simmer the mixture until it becomes thick.
Ladle the hot jam into prepared jars, leaving 1/2’ headspace. Wipe rims and secure lids.
ladle into hot jars
Process the jam in a boiling water bath canner for 10 minutes.
process in a water bath cannerRemove the jars from the canner and allow to cool. Check lids for a proper seal, and store any that have not sealed properly in the refrigerator. Store well-sealed jars at room temperature for up to a year. Refrigerate after opening.

Over to You

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If you are not familiar with the water bath canning method watch our water bath canning video workshop. Always make sure you are following all safety guidelines outlined by the USDA when canning anything. Keeping a great journal leads to delicious results! Get inspired by new recipes, expert articles and homemade food adventures in our Monthly Journal.

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