Huckleberry Jelly

What You'll Need

Equipment
Ingredients

Huckleberries epitomize the spirit of DIY. They aren't found in stores, on farms. They grow wild in just the right places, watered only by fog or creek water, their dark leathery leaves gathering sun from between cracks in the redwood canopy. Their berries dark as shadows, hidden beneath the leaves. 

So to get them, you have to hunt them. You have to track them down and harvest them, one tiny berry at a time. Plink. Plink. Plink...

It's not efficient, but that is not the point. Joy is the point. Harvesting wild foods is the point. Nourishing your spirit is the point. Getting out in the woods, breathing the fresh air, taking a piece of the wild world into you...ah, now, THAT is the point.

We've used homemade pectin in this recipe, too. Because clearly, you see the value in taking time, and doing things the sweet, old-fashioned way.
Enjoy.

Please be sure of your identification and do not forage for wild foods unless you are an expert at plant identification.

If you are not familiar with the water bath canning method watch our water bath canning video workshop. Always make sure you are following all safety guidelines outlined by the USDA when canning anything. 

Directions

Sterilize your jars and canning tools. Set aside.
Start your canner boiling for processing.
In a large saucepan over medium heat, add the apple pectin. homemade pectin
Pour in the sugar and stir until dissolved.
add sugar
Add the berries. Don't worry if they're a little stemmy, or have green bits. The green, unripe berries add pectin, and they will be strained out along with the stems, after cooking.
add huckleberries
Raise the heat and boil the mixture until berries are throughly soft.
Mash the softened berries to release their purple juices.
mash berries
Prepare a jelly straining bag and a bowl to catch the strained juices. Pour the berry mixture through the jelly straining bag and allow it to drip for 45 minutes to an hour. Do not squeeze the bag or the jelly will be cloudy. Meanwhile, prepare a water bath canner and 4 oz jars.
When straining is done, pour the berry juices back into the pot and return to a boil. Remove from heat.
boil jelly
Pour the juice and pectin mixture into 4 oz jelly jars.
canning jelly
Wipe the rims and secure the lids just finger-tight.
clean jars
Place the jars in a boiling water bath canner and return to a boil.
Process for 10 minutes after the water returns to a boil.
process jars for canning
Remove the jars from the canner with a jar lifter and gently set on a clean towel. Allow cooling before storing in a cool, dark place. Check that your jars have sealed properly. Jars that have not properly sealed can be stored in the refrigerator or eaten immediately.

If you are not familiar with the water bath canning method watch our water bath canning video workshop. Always make sure you are following all safety guidelines outlined by the USDA when canning anything. 

Over to You

It’s part of our mission here at Mountain Feed to help you make delicious, sustainable, homemade food more often. Stop by and say hello on FacebookTwitterInstagram or Pinterest. Or, as always, you can do it the old fashioned way and come by the store to speak with one of our in-house experts.

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